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7 Biggest Plagiarism Stories In Show Business

Has creativity gone creativity gone to the dogs(if you may allow me to abuse man’s best friend, they don’t deserve this!).

Nothing really appears to emerge from the head anymore. The first thing most bands talk about when they establish are their influences-and normally they kick it off by(and never actually stop) playing other artist’s music. It transcends every genre: blues, folk,and hip-hop. Simply put, most of the artists you adore out there, either through pure adoration or blatant thievery once, and are standing, on the proverbial shoulders of giants.

This article sees some of the high profile showbiz plagiarism debate, which may be interesting to the reader.

George Harrison (My Sweet Lord)

Beatlehood was an institution, right? But then George Harrison appeared to have no trouble transitioning from it, with his first solo after the break up, All Things Must Pass sending tongues wagging that really he was in it. But after “My Sweet Lord”, a lead single emerged, it was said he had a little bit of help in finding his voice from the girl group, The Chiffons “He’s So Fine”. According to the judge who ruled this matter in 1976, both songs were virtually identical! But how much did this borrowing go? You are the jury.

The Strokes ( Last Night)

Albert Hammond,Jr, back in 2001, set classic rock aficionados on fire when The Strokes hit, “Last Night” first bubbled onto FM radio. Well, why? The garage was once more open to to the mainstream. But alas! “Check, it sounds more like Petty’s American Girl’”. Not the whole truth though, for instance there is no Mike Campbell’s Fraggle Rock,but again that opening chord-it must be a C-will just let you scream “Thief!”.

Oasis (The Shakermaker)

Luke Bradley’s piece revisiting Oasis’ discography implies that the brothers, Gallagher, owe some bit more to the famous The Beatles than just a passing nod in their liner notes. However, one talent that they do not require thanking Fab Four is the songwriting assistance in Definitely Maybe single hit “Shakermaker”. That thank you note, apparently, ought to be addressed to The New Seekers “ I’d Like to Teach the World How to Sing”. There was a case-out-of-pocket, though…but this makes you think about all that money your mom forked on your piano lessons.

The Beach Boys (Surfin U.S.A)

You are not about to argue with this: “Surfin’ U.S.A” is a similar song to “Sweet Little Sixteen”. However, you are not going to lay the accusing fingers only at the Beach Boys. Chuck Berry has been ripped off by several artistes over years, particularly his melody for “Johnny B. Goode.

John Fogerty ( The Old Man Down The Road)

You are John Fogerty and after disappointing 70s solo albums plus legal battles with your own record label, you vamoose from the (music) business. You return 9 years later rejuvenated and refreshed in 1985 and record number One, Centerfield, in the process promptly you get into legal problems due to your singe named “The Old Man Down The Road” since it awfully sounds much the same as the old band’s “Run Through The Jungle”. Ok, John Forgerty, run and welcome back! There was a legal lawsuit, but finally Fogerty beat the rap, and recouped his legal costs, even helping establish some Supreme Court precedent!

Ray Parker, Jr. (Ghostbusters Theme)

You can love Ray Parker, so much. But was Huey Lewis out of the line after blaming this guy for lifting his song, “ I want a New Drug?” Both songs haunt each other slightly in rhythm. However, they do not run toe to toe. They had to settle this out of court, though, but the spirit of “The Ghostbusters” still lives on

Crazy Doggz (Doggy Bounce)

This saga just tells you if you happen to steal a song, even just as a fictional TV band, you are going to pay. This is the bitter lesson Demetri, Todd, and Murray Hewitt, their bumbling manager discovered with “Doggy Bounce (cover version). Well, as per Murray, the two songs (don’t ask me the other) came out a whole 13 years before Crazy Dogggz’ original version. Is that bad, or is that normal?

Amanda Sten often finds help in writing articles on Edusson platform.